Did Christ die in vain” Part Two



In Part One of this series of articles we began by suggesting that to a significant percentage of the world’s population, Jesus’ claim to have died for the sins of the world was a big waste of time.   Those who feel this way are basically individuals who do not believe that He was/is God’s son and do not believe that His death was any more significant than the death of any ordinary person.”  Our purpose in this article is to look more closely at the resurrection of Jesus for if Jesus was not raised from the dead, then His death was indeed in vain, wasted motion, useless sacrifice.  That would defeat His very purpose of coming.
Some people claim they believe many good things about Jesus, but they then contend He was not raised from the dead.  It appears that to this class of people Jesus was a good and moral person who did many wonderful things and taught others many valuable lessons in living a better kind of life.  It seems that they stop short of admitting that He was indeed God’s only begotten Son, and contend that there were no Bible miracles, including the resurrection. While death is a natural reality to the living, to say that Jesus was not resurrected makes the reason for His untimely death to have been in vain.  
The Bible message is that there was no other way for mankind to be reconciled back to God other than through the death and resurrection of Jesus.  For centuries men had tried a system that required moral excellence and total perfection of humans in order to be found in God’s favor – The Law of Moses.  The Jewish nation failed miserably as did all of mankind (Hebrews 8:6-9).  Paul tells us in Galatians 3:24-27 (KJV) ²⁴ Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith. ²⁵ But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster. ²⁶ For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus.  ²⁷ For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.”
All of our hope and God’s promises center on “The Word which was with God and was God, and became flesh to dwell among men.” (John 1:1-3, 14).  “For in Him dwelled all the fulness of the Godhead bodily” (Colossians 2:9).  However, if the death of Jesus was the end of the story, this reconciliation would be incomplete!  The Apostle Paul affirmed in 1 Corinthians 15:14, ¹⁷ “And if Christ hath not been raised, then is our preaching vain, your faith also is vain...And if Christ hath not been raised, your faith is vain, ye are yet in your sins.”  Paul here shows the futility of all our efforts if the resurrection is not so.
Thank God for the triumphal sound of Paul’s next assertion: 1 Corinthians 15:20 “But now hath Christ been raised from the dead, the firstfruit of them that are asleep.”  Jesus had to be resurrected in order to conquer death itself and provide for us the hope of our own resurrection.  Those who are “asleep,” that is dead, would still be held in that prison if He was not raised.  Jesus broke through that stranglehold.  To do this He had to destroy the works and the power grip that Satan held over mankind.  You sin, you die, which means Satan wins.   But he doesn’t win because Jesus not only died, but broke the chains of death.  Hebrews 2:14-15 (KJV) ¹⁴ Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil; ¹⁵ And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.
His death was not in vain for His resurrection is a fact!  His death has power to accomplish all that God intended since he came forth triumphant over death. (To be continued in our next article.)

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